Gallery Contributions by Bil Krame

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Programmer: Bill Kramer
Last update: April 17 2015

Contributions to Galleries

Made by Bil Krame

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Gallery: tse2010
Shadows on the deck of the Paul Gauguin before totality - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Gallery: tse2009
3rd contact, 400mm with Canon Digital EOS, on board the Paul Gauguin - courtesy of Bill Kramer
2nd contact, 400mm with Canon Digital EOS, on board the Paul Gauguin - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Deck of the Paul Gauguin during the partial phases - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Gallery: tse2008
Mid eclipse - Polarflug, 400mm w/Canon digital EOS - courtesy of Bill Kramer
2nd contact, 400mm with Canon EOS, Polarflug - courtesy of Bill Kramer
3rd contact, 400mm with Canon Digital EOS, Polarflug - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Gallery: tse2006
Waiting for totality - courtesy of Bill Kramer
- courtesy of Bill Kramer
Gallery: tse2002
3rd contact, from roadside rest in Zimbabwe, Questar prime focus, scanned from slide - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Zimbabwe roadside rest, Questar prime focus, scanned from slide film - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Gallery: tse2001
Prominence by Peter Barry - courtesy of Bill Kramer
300mm lens, Zambia - courtesy of Bill Kramer
70mm lens, Zambia - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Eclipse Safaris Group picture - Zambia - courtesy of Bill Kramer
3rd contact - Questar prime focus - Zambia - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Gallery: tse1999
2nd contact, prime focus Questar, Germany - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Germany, prime focus though Questar, scanned from slide - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Germany, prime focus through Questar, scanned from slide - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Columbus Astronomical Society in Germany (plus one extra) - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Gallery: tse1998
Questar prime focus, scanned from slide - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Questar prime focus on board the Veendam - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Video capture by Denise - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Veendam - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Gallery: collect/Art
Total Automation Failure During Totality, if something can go wrong it most likely will. Prepare for the worst case is the motto of most veteran eclipse photographers. Water color by Bill Kramer 2012.
Total Automation Failure During Totality, if something can go wrong it most likely will. Prepare for the worst case is the motto of most veteran eclipse photographers. Water color by Bill Kramer 2012.
Mandela Eclipse Design by Clare Casey - see website clareityexpressions.com for more.
Phase Eclipse Design by Clare Casey - see website clareityexpressions.com for more.
Gallery: ase2012
2nd Contact, 400mm Canon DSLR, by Denise Kramer
Mid Eclipse - from Shasta Lake Dam in California - by Denise Kramer
Denise set up at Shasta Lake dam taking pictures with the Canon and 400mm - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Hydrogen alpha telescope and Donald using solar glasses to watch the partial phase of the eclipse. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Mount Shasta over Shasta Lake. A great observing site for the annular eclipse. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Setting up atop Shasta Lake dam. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Pin hole images projected through a hat with many holes. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Pin hole projections through a pin tree on to a towel. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Mt Shasta Lake dam observing site with Coronado hydrogen alpha telescope and viewers. Bill Kramer (with silly hat) shares the view and talks about the view through the telescope. Photo by Dale G.
Gallery: vt2012
Projection from Orion 12 inch on the pier at Bora Bora. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Battery of telescopes on pier at Bora Bora - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Bora Bora in the background for our set up in French Polynesia. - courtesy of Rajko Zupan, Captain of the Paul Gauguin cruise ship.
Our pier side set up with Paul Gauguin in background. Getting ready for the transit of Venus. Photo from in a Zodiac pulling up to the pier - courtesy of Rajko Zupan, ship captain.
Venus enters the stage. Jim and Sherry Gardepe set up on the parking deck of a medical office tower in Huntsville, AL to share the afternoon transit with others. - courtesy of Jim Gardepe
Venus on the Sun and a bit of cloud. Jim and Sherry Gardepe set up on the parking deck of a medical office tower in Huntsville, AL to share the afternoon transit with others. - courtesy of Jim Gardepe
Venus on the Sun and a bit of cloud. Jim and Sherry Gardepe set up on the parking deck of a medical office tower in Huntsville, AL to share the afternoon transit with others. - courtesy of Jim Gardepe
Venus and misty clouds. Jim and Sherry Gardepe set up on the parking deck of a medical office tower in Huntsville, AL to share the afternoon transit with others. - courtesy of Jim Gardepe
Venus mid transit. Jim and Sherry Gardepe set up on the parking deck of a medical office tower in Huntsville, AL to share the afternoon transit with others. - courtesy of Jim Gardepe
Double transit - Venus and a jet. Jim and Sherry Gardepe set up on the parking deck of a medical office tower in Huntsville, AL to share the afternoon transit with others. - courtesy of Jim Gardepe
Jim and Sherry Gardepe set up on the parking deck of a medical office tower in Huntsville, AL to share the afternoon transit with others.
Gallery: collect/Humor

Selective hearing - is common with eclipse chasers when it comes to weather reports. In my own experience it did not matter how the rest of the trip went so long as the eclipse was visible.

(copyright 2012) Bill Kramer - created using iPad and Artrage app.

Eclipse trip report - It is all about the weather when it comes to eclipse trip reporting. And only the weather during the eclipse. So long as the eclipse is seen, the trip is considered as a great success. - (c)2012 Bill Kramer

Calculation Error - Doing your own eclipse calculations could result in being in the wrong place. It is always best to double check (and more) with other resources including this website. While it is not difficult to calculate the circumstances for an eclipse, it is tedious. That means it is not too hard to end up a missing decimal point or dropping a sign. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Education - Sometimes the local translation is not all that clear when describing upcoming solar eclipse events. At one eclipse our tour director had a sense of humor and told everyone the costumed hotel staff had spears in case the sun did not return when we were done eclipsing it. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Mobility - Mobility means move it when you must. If you are on a ship, then move to clear sky. Look for the sparkles on the water. It is that simple. What kind of lame brain parks a ship in the ocean and hopes the weather is cooperative? - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Mobility - Close is not enough when it comes to a total solar eclipse. Being just outside the zone of totality is orders of magnitude different when compared to what one can see inside the zone. Stay in the zone! - courtesy of Bill Kramer
The Press - Interviews with the press can sometimes be a chore. In this case the interviewer thinks an annular eclipse means it comes each year. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Extreme eclipse chaser - using a circus human cannon to get above the clouds. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Extreme Eclipse Chaser - a rocket enhanced hang glider to get above the clouds. Looks like it make be clearing up though. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Extreme Eclipse Chaser - wing walking above the clouds with a tripod and camera, planned at the last second, would only be available for a couple die hard eclipse fanatics. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Kids and eclipses - when you bring kids to an eclipse, let them be kids and have a place to play away from the telescopes and cameras. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Kids at an Eclipses - From the perspective of a kid, watching it on TV is just like the real thing. Make sure they come outside to actually see it! - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Kids at a solar eclipse Except for the dynamic diamond rings and totality, most kids are much more interested in playing. And it will not seem as special to them, until years later when you hear them telling one of their friends about it. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Always improving Eclipse calculations are always improving. The current method was created in the late 1700s however it has undergone regular improvement to increase accuracy. Today, eclipse timing, with limb corrections, is accurate to about 1/10 of a second. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Inspiration The SAROS series is invented to simplify the work of astronomers way back when there were no computers, slide rules, decimal points, ... - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Always improving Eclipse calculations are always improving. The current method was created in the late 1700s however it has undergone regular improvement to increase accuracy. Today, eclipse timing, with limb corrections, is accurate to about 1/10 of a second. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Error Trusting automation for a solar eclipse photo shoot? Make double and triple sure the time and location are correct, check the GPS link (if using one), battery state, and then enjoy the show! - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Jay Anderson An eclipse climate and weather expert of great reputation, Jay Anderson is a meteorologist out of Canada, works with Travel Quest for eclipse tours, and is a respected member of the eclipse chaser community. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
2017 Eclipse In 2017 a total solar eclipse visits the American lower 48 cutting from Oregon through to South Carolina. To see the eclipse as total, one must be positioned along the central path. Eclipse maps are available at a number of places with details. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
What will you see? You see in an eclipse what you bring to the event. Religious minded people will see a miracle, science minded might see something they have studied for the first time, children will imagine all sorts of things. It is kind of like looking at clouds and seeing shapes. But it goes by too quickly. Regardless of where your mind comes from, it is a marvelous thing to behold. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Modern multimedia Several friends and colleagues have started modern media campaigns to alert people to the 2017 total solar over the USA. Just wait until the other ones show up! Let us hope we have a head start and some momentum by then to counter the wrong information that will be appearing in droves. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Science Club Experiment Idea Do you have a science club at school? You can do scientific data gathering during a solar eclipse (total or partial). - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Science Club Experiment Idea Weather statistics during a solar eclipse are of interest to meteorologists and eclipse experts. Help gather data by recording the temperature, wind, and other specifics during the course of a solar eclipse. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Photographic quandary Do you take long focal length images or landscape images? Both can be fun and challenging subjects during the short time period of totality. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Eclipse in Space How cool would it be to see an eclipse from a sub orbital space craft? That could become reality in the next decade or so. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Mega Movie Project Plans are underway to film the 2017 TSE along the path and create a single movie. Of course this could mean that union contractors get involved and lighting will be called in. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Enforcer An eFlight is one that views an eclipse out one side of the airplane. Sometimes, to make a little extra cash, travel companies will sell the other side of the aircraft too. A side enforcer is needed in those cases! - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Overload Contrails are a common sight in most of the USA. They are vapor clouds left behind high flying aircraft. When an eclipse is overhead, aircraft should avoid flying over clear areas! - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Ultimate Chasing a solar eclipse in a suborbital flight. How many years until we see that? - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Rocket Eclipse Rocket science is a tricky thing. Building one just to fly into space to see a (very) short eclipse is not logical. The umbra moves slower than a rocket. Better to use a super sonic aircraft with adequate windows! - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Birth of a slogan Seen the GreatAmericanEcliose.com web site yet? This is how they got the slogan. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Refinement Sometimes it takes some effort to refine a slogan. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Selling Eclipse Travel Somehow it just seems shady. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Gallery: tse2012
Wide angle view of eclipse from the Paul Gauguin - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Gallery: p2014oct
Pinhole On the solar tower. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
SEC2014 Our group at the SEC2014 set up for the partial solar eclipse. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
SEC2014 Three Amigos Xavier Jubier, Micheal Zeiler, Bill Kramer were just some of the gang at the Solar Eclipse Conference in Cloudcroft MN, and pre conference at Sunspot Observatory. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Gallery: tse2016
Eclipse At Sea View from deck of Volendam in the Makassar Straights - courtesy of Bill Kramer
2nd Contact Beads and a diamond ring, with a nice prominence at 2nd contact. Handheld Canon Powershot 65x. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Eclipse Chaser 16 for 16 Eclipse chaser picture by ship photographer (cropped). I used the 15x70 binoculars during totality. Excellent views! - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Gallery: tse2017
2nd Contact Franklin Kentucky - Canon Powershot SX60HS handheld. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
First Contact (ish) with my trusty old Quester telescope (vintage 1963). Sun viewer by Kathy Shaw. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Just before 2nd contact Brightness reduced, contrast enhanced, photosphere still overwhelms! Just a fraction of a second before 2nd contact. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Corona and Regulas 1/40s exposure showing coronal streamers and Regulas near the Sun. - courtesy of Bill Kramer
Wide Angle 21mm view shows Venus to the right. And jet contrails. - courtesy of Bill Kramer

Log Sheet for Bil Krame